whole30 day 20

It’s day twenty, which means I am two thirds of the way finished with the Whole 30 challenge! Despite the fact that I’ve been pretty laidback about some of the rules, I am still going to feel mighty proud when I get finished. You need another indication of how slack I am over Whole 30 rules? Well, technically we aren’t supposed to weigh ourselves during the challenge because we’re not supposed focus on the weightloss so much as simply becoming more healthy, but I went ahead and did it anyway this morning…

Weigh-in:

On day one when I started I weighed in at 68.6 kilograms. That means a loss of four kilograms, or nine pounds! I am pretty impressed. I wish that I had taken my measurements on day one too. I would really have liked to have known how much I lost in my waist and hips. I am a little anxious to see what will happen when I start introducing dairy and rice back into my diet. Hopefully I can keep this weight off despite that!

Breakfast / Lunch (pictured below): We woke up a bit late and stayed busy doing mock JLPT tests through until dinner, so thankfully this this veggie and egg fry up was pretty filling. I also had a coconut coffee too!


Snack: A small handful of nuts and a black coffee while studying some Japanese grammar.

Dinner: Evan and I went to our favorite restaurant in Chikugo, Sukeroku, and this is what we had for dinner. Vegetable stir fry, yama-imo somen, green tea, and salmon sashimi (not pictured because we gobbled it up too quickly). This dinner and the chat we had with the couple behind the counter was a nice respite from all of the cramming.


Comments: Tomorrow is the big day! JLPT N4. This week Evan and I have done two mock exams, and I am really glad we did. They were really hard and I can see now that I have a lot of gaps in my grammar and kanji knowledge, but it also really helped put me into the test-taking mindset. Here are some of the things that I picked up while doing our run-throughs…

  1. Pay attention to context clues! You probably don’t know the kanji, so be very careful about what is happening before and after that word so that you can determine the yomi-kata and/or the meaning of the word.
  2. Read the questions and answer choices carefully. The test-makers are super tricky about their wording, and the hiragana, katakana, and kanji they choose to use in the answer choices are often only one stroke off from each other, like the hiragana ki and sa, or the kanji for “to wait” and “to bring”.
  3. Follow your gut while picking your answers. Don’t think too hard or go back and forth second-guessing yourself. Probably the answer that sounds/looks most natural to you is indeed the correct one.
  4. When doing the comprehension sections, read the questions and answers first before diving into reading that huge block of text. It’ll give you a better idea of what to be looking out for while reading and sifting through excess information.
  5. Even though the grammar part comes first, skip straight to the back of that section to the reading parts. It takes much longer to dissect, translate, and answer those questions, and they are by far the hardest questions on the test (and therefore probably worth more points), so tackle those first while your brain is fresh. Also, that beginning grammar part is pretty fast, benefits more from your gut instincts, and is, if not exactly easy, certainly easier than the reading.

All right, I think those are the main things I learned this week. Hopefully all my cramming pays off and I am able to scrape by tomorrow! Oyasumi!

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2 thoughts on “whole30 day 20

  1. Little late to the game here, but congrats on those lost 9 lbs!!! Also, learning Japanese sounds very challenging, but rewarding. I need to sit my butt down and really focus on vocabulary. Also, you inspire me to make food changes and be more mindful about what I eat.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Japanese is tough! To be honest, the only way I really enjoy “studying” Japanese is by being out in the real world talking to people, but that’s also kind of scary/intimidating… Using a textbook can be so dry and boring though!

      Like

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